‘The Minnesota Paradox’ – The New York Times


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Minnesota’s Twin Cities metro area has one of the country’s highest standards of living by many measures: high incomes, long life expectancy, a large number of corporate headquarters and a rich cultural scene.

But these headline statistics hide a problem: The Twin Cities also have some of the largest racial inequities in the U.S.

Incomes for white families are similar to those in other affluent metro areas, like Atlanta and Los Angeles. Incomes for black families are close to those in poorer regions like Cleveland and New Orleans:

Samuel L. Myers Jr., an economist at the University of Minnesota, has named this combination “the Minnesota paradox.” Because the area is predominantly white, the racial gaps can get lost in the overall numbers.

Other protest developments:


Marcus is calling for a “harm reduction” approach. People won’t remain shuttered in their houses for months, just as they won’t stop having sex. The key instead, she says, is helping people understand how to reduce their risk of contracting the virus — say, by meeting up with a few (masked) friends in a public park. If shaming keeps them from doing so, they may instead meet indoors, which is much more dangerous.

“The abstinence-only and harm reduction approaches share the same goal of reducing illness and death,” she told me, “but from what we know about H.I.V., substance use and other areas of health, harm reduction is far more likely to work.”

For more, check out an infographic on risk that Marcus and Ellie Murray, another epidemiologist, created; and Marcus’s more recent Atlantic article, which promotes the Canadian idea of “double bubbles,” in which two families agree to merge their quarantines.

It’s been seven years since Lady Gaga’s last dance-pop album, and her newly released “Chromatica” is a highly anticipated return to form. The Times’s pop music editor, Caryn Ganz, writes that the album “has some sparkling vocal moments” and ready-for-the-dance floor hits.

“But it feels overwhelmingly safe — a low bar to clear when you’ve released two of the greatest pop albums of the century,” she continues.






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